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Haflin Creek Trail BikingHikingTrail Running

Difficulty
Condition
Good

Notes: 9.14.21

Trail Length
3.9 miles
Distance from Durango
10 miles
Directions
Gain
3000 ft
Rating
0 Loves (log in or register to love this trail!)

Haflin Creek Trail

Biking, Hiking, Trail Running
Durango to TH

10 Miles

Gain

3000 Feet

Condition

Good

Trail Length

3.9 Miles

Photo Courtesy of Missy Thompson

Part of the Missionary Ridge trails system.

Haflin Creek to Missionary Ridge is a good half-day, advanced hike, bike or horseback through the dramatic remnants of the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire. Haflin Canyon takes you up from the Animas Valley through nearly 3,000 feet of ascent. Use caution when traveling on windy days, as burnt trees are still falling from the fire. This 6.4-mile hike (round-trip) starts at 6,620 feet and climbs to 9,400 feet, beginning near Haflin Creek. This trail rises above the creek, crosses and reached to top of the ridge for a good view of the river valley below. From Durango, head east on 32nd Street and travel to the end, turning left on County Road 250. After just over 5 miles of travel, you’ll see a sign on the east side of the road for Haflin Creek.
The Missionary Ridge trail network is an unknown gem even to most locals. There are multiple trailheads that offer a selection of generally snow-free, three-season hikes in the low country. In spring, aspen corridors are carpeted with purple larkspur and sunny dandelion. Spears of lupine and alpine rose fill green glades with sublime fragrance. Look out from the well-earned ridgetop to the La Plata range and the San Juan Mountains. Great review in The Durango Herald.

Map & Directions

Map Coordinates: 37.361835, -107.820768

Where's the Trailhead?

dIRECTIONS TO TRAILHEAD

Haflin Creek Parking Area

From 9th Street and Main Avenue in Durango, head east on 9th Street toward 2nd Avenue. Turn left onto east 3rd Street and turn right onto Florida Road. At the round-a-bout stay straight to continue on Florida Road. Turn left onto CR 250 at the traffic light. After 5 miles, a dirt parking area will be on your right. Haflin Creek trail will ascend from this parking area.

Trailwork

help build our trails!

Cutthroat Trail Maintenance | Saturday, September 25th

Join us for trail maintenance on Cutthroat Trail on September 25th from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm. Please note, registration is required to join us for Trailwork; please click below to register.

Volunteer!

Love the Trails Like a Local

Say Hi

Greet all trail users by saying hi when passing on the trail.

Announce Yourself

Say "on your left" as approaching other trail users from behind.

Pick Up After Yourself

Pick up after yourself and your pet. Please don’t litter.

Keep Dogs on a Leash

Keep your dogs on a leash or leave them at home. Off-leash dogs are not allowed on City Open Space and are the number one source of trail conflict.

Stay on the Trail

Help protect natural areas and habitats by staying on established trails. Creating "social trails", cutting switchbacks, or ignoring trail closures leads to greater erosion and impacts on ecosystems.

Give Uphill Traffic the
Right of Way

Uphill traffic always has the right of way. Downhill traffic must be in control, especially around blind corners, to avoid coming in contact with uphill traffic.

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